Gourmet Love

I have a new favorite thing, rather silly it is. Okay, I'll just tell you and get it over with. I love watching old episodes of The Galloping Gourmet with Graham Kerr on Cooking Network. There, I've told you. I used to be in love with Jacques Pepin, but now it's Graham. He's so funny, and he never actually cooks anything worth eating, but he cracks me up so much that I just can't help but watch. I even tape the show and watch it two, sometimes three times.

He's like a lost cast member from Monty Python; he's like Dick Van Dyke with a proper British accent; he's tipsy, hilarious, swanky, silly. In about two hours he'll be on. Yesterday was crab and veggies wrapped in a filo dough. It doesn't matter what he cooks. I'll be watching and so will the kids. Then it's off to the library for more books, though I shouldn't read too much because I'm determined to get my book written before Sept. 1. I will, and that's that.

A nice Picture of Graham. Graham the Man.


I love this old 70's kitchen set-up. It's groooooy.

Comments

  1. Well aren't you the fickle on! :) First Jacques, now Graham... who will be next?

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  2. I don't know . . . I hope it isn't Jamie Oliver.

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  3. Why doesn't this surprise me? He seems to fit right with your groovy personality.

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  4. Hehehehe, you know me too well. I should go punk and flip all your expectations!

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  5. I'll have to look that up, Amy - it looks good! Forget Jamie Oliver!

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  6. Oh and - by the way - I hope enough people tell you how good you are at what you do, the writing, etc. I'm sure you are good at all sorts of other stuff too. Your stories are lovely, but the professionals may be too scared to tell you. They might leave it up to people like us.

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  7. That is so sweet Tom, and I almost started crying because I'm having one of those "I'm a horrible writer" type of days that we all have at one one or another. Really sweet. You're such a good friend!!!

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  8. I said the same to a really successful British writer last night whose plays are on all week here on the BBC, via email, and he replied to me this morning to thank me for my encouragement. Everyone needs to know they are on the right track, no matter how well they do from it. It takes real friends to tell you that you are NOT on the right track, but those cannot be created artificially. One of my biggest regrets was to ignore a young girl-friend who became a famous punk-rocker in the 70's, after she went slightly mad through fame. She almost killed herself, and I think I could have stopped that. But - remember - that was FAME, not failure.

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  9. Well, thank you Tom. It's nice to have the encouragement! One thing I have to say is how sad it made me feel to have an agent rejection or such, because it was as if I let you guys, my friends, down. It's really hurt me terribly to fail like that, so much that I can't even bare to talk about it on here. But I'm still working hard to get published. I just want you to know that. I hope it will happen some day.

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  10. Kerr was crazy; as you say, all his food was inedible. Contrary to Tom, I actually like Jamie Oliver. I think he's taken away a lot of fear that people had over cooking. I also think he's taught people to think about food and flavours in a new way. However, I can't stand all the commercialization that surrounds him. A recent guest left behind a magazine called 'Jamie', you wouldn't believe the extent of his empire!!!

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  11. That's sort of an American thing I think. Every TV chef has their own line of cookware. Martha Stewart was the forerunner.

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  12. And let's not forget George Foreman's sandwich-toaster,. Old George, with his fists up, advertising it...

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