The man who got away



photo credit: Skip Homeier, "Alfred Hitchcock Presents," "Momentum," 1956 via photopin (license)

Tall, dark and handsome William is high commodity for the Seekers; his soul has the ability to provide the psychic cult with enough power that they can gather and control any human they wish. But when something goes wrong in the Eclipse William is left only half a man, invisible and completely alone in the world. The cult yet seeks to cull him, but William is rebellious and has decided to stay in his invisible state forever. Until Emma comes along. The only normal human able to see him, Emma and William form an immediate bond that quickly turns into love. It's a love William resists as much as the cult: he must protect her from a similar state of non-existence. But Emma is rebellious too, and she ain't leaving town without her ghost.

The only problem in falling in love with a 'ghost' is . . . everything.

A new Eclipse ceremony provides a pivotal moment of change. William is changed back into a full-fledged human, and he and Emma are ecstatic to be together in every way—yet even that bears its own responsibility. The two can get married, a former phantasm from the 50s and a hippie wild-child from the 70s—but the differences between them soon become insurmountable, like mountains. The past creeps in. William, unable to exist in the modern world, secretly dabbles with his ability to time-travel, and soon the betrayal of finding out he's in two places at once is too much for Emma to take. So, William stays in his time and she in hers.

In The Love Seekers Emma is now with Jesse, the rebellious musician who wishes to outshine his famous rock star father. His dreams soon come true—before long he's signing a contract with big shot producer Phil Keel, and he and Emma move from studios to stadiums. It's the right kind of tornado for Emma, whose only wish is to forget. Forget time, forget past mistakes, forget love.

Love will always come back to haunt you.

There comes a time when the perfect storm brings two people back together again. All of the pain and guilt of unrequited happiness becomes a phantasm its own. There's this one moment, this one opportunity, if only for the last time. William and Emma meet amidst the backdrop of Dylan and Ginsberg; his apartment is situated in Greenwich village, mere walking distance from Washington Square Park where all the hippies, poets and freaks hang out. JFK is still president, but he won't be for long. There's a hint of regret in the air, and also the chance to make things right. William, a writer, is intent on keeping Emma—after all, she belonged to him first. The truth is it's up to her. And for now, all she wants is one final moment, to exist the way they always wanted to, but never could. William was also her first love, and saying goodbye back then was hard enough, but she must do it again because but real commitments tie her to present day. For William, it's no casual affair. On the brink of losing everything, he makes it clear that if she doesn't come back he'll be hell-bent on self destruction.

The man Emma left behind is as broken as her.

In The Love Seekers two people who once believed they would be together forever must now fight for seconds, minutes, days. Emma has to make a choice: stay in the present world where she belongs or return to the past where true love awaits. It's a love that should never have been possible, but somehow fate made it happen.

The Love Seekers can be purchased through WiDo or Amazon.

Peace.

Comments

  1. Hi Amy, how fun to see you in my comments section. It's been a long time and I see you have written more books in the meantime. Emma has a difficult decision to make for sure. Take care.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Inger! I've said it before, but you have truly gorgeous photos on your blog and it's a true pleasure to stop by. And yes, Emma does have a tough decision to make!

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